Week In Compliance: Bankers believe that their employees do not want overtime pay

American Bankers Association reports that banks believe their overtime exempt employees do not want overtime pay, as stated by Christeena Naser, Vice President and Sr Counsel. This opinion stems from the Department of Labor’s new interpretation of the Primary Duty Test. “The term “primary duty” means the principal, main, major or most important duty that the employee performs. Determination of an employee’s primary duty must be based on all the facts in a particular case, with the major emphasis on the character of the employee’s job as a whole.” (DOL). ABA goes onto to state that the Test’s objective was to identify obvious non-exempt employees, but the new interpretation would seem to try to identify obvious exempt employees. The difference in nearly $27,000, or about 30 Million employees across all industries.

The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) today announced a settlement with Desert Palace, Inc. d/b/a Caesars Palace where Caesars agreed to pay an $8 million civil money penalty for its willful and repeated violations of the Bank Secrecy Act. In addition, the casino agreed to conduct periodic external audits and independent testing of its anti-money laundering compliance program, report to FinCEN on mandated improvements, adopt a rigorous training regime, and engage in a “look-back” for suspicious transactions. – FinCEN

CFPB reported that it has handled 677,200 complaints nationally. – SubPrime Auto Finance News Staff

Big companies are some of the worst offenders in foreign corruption cases, but they are also increasingly policing themselves and self-reporting instances of bribery, new data show. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development analyzed 427 cases of foreign bribery in 17 countries to determine who’s bribing who, and how authorities are discovering corrupt practices. – Kathleen Caulderwood at International Business Times

FTC can sue companies for inadequate cyber-security protection, so says the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. – Dan Appleman at FCPA Blog

Caesar’s Palace to pay $8 Million penalty on poor compliance regime. FinCEN has also forced the Palace to take on additional action for boosting compliance an a lookback program to seek noncompliance in past transactions. “When it came to watching out for illicit activity, [Caesar’s Palace] allowed a blind spot in its compliance program,” says Jennifer Shasky, director at FinCEN.

“Whistle-blowers and insiders play an increasingly important role in our work,” says David Green, Director of the Serious Fraud Office in the UK. “I suggest… moving away from the identification principle of corporate criminal liability in English law and embracing something closer to vicarious liability, as in the USA,” he said in his speech at the 33rd Cambridge Economic Crime Symposium.

By performing an assessment of OFAC compliance programs and establishing a culture of compliance throughout the organization, a company can position itself to better understand and identify potential risk exposure. – Sven Stumbauer, Director in the Financial Crimes Compliance Practice at AlixPartners, LLP at International Banker

Jobs In Compliance

Opinion: FRB of Boston says Prepaid cards can be a savings tool, and I agree 

credit Danny Choo

Prepaid cards from credit card companies have grown significantly in the past decade. They offer credit transactions to those who do not have the credit history to have credit cards. They offer a way to build credit for those who cannot even open a bank account. These are people and families who make $25,000 or less. If you are reading this, you are very likely a person with a bank account and a credit card. You might not know, but there are people who do not qualify to have a bank account. I was once such a person. But I wasn’t the norm of such a person. I had graduated from college and I didn’t yet have a job. During college, I had a college student checking out. I was moving back home 2,000 miles away from my bank. So, I needed a local bank. Wells Fargo said that I had overdrafted too many times and I do not have a history of income that would otherwise let them overlooking this. I was shocked. I didn’t know that banks refused to open checking accounts. Even more astonishing, this was at a time when checking account were not free. I went down the street to Key Bank, who opened an account for me. I got a job and Key Bank had my business for many years. But most people who do not qualify for checking account aren’t in my position. They have never made enough money to have any savings at all, which means even if they had a checking account, it would sit empty. Even having an account for someone open a bank up to various risks, which all have a cost. But financial institutions have come up with a solution: Prepaid Card. This uses the credit network for transactions but at no time transactions beyond the amount in the card can be made. And banks do not have to offer any services, keeping all of the information on the card. Actually, in Eastern Africa, the same type of decentralized banking system is growing through cellphones. And if you think about it a little longer, Bitcoin and other cyber-currencies are just another decentralized payment system, albeit with more value involved. What Prepaid Cards offer is not merely a way to make transactions. It can be method to store value, as economists would put it. That is, a person can save money in such cards. The difference for the user is minimal for the most part. Sure, it is less secure because if you lose it, you’ve lost all of your money, just like cash. But it is safer than cash since it is possible to have an account on that card, even though it wouldn’t have any of the protections of a checking account. At least, there would be a remote way to stop transactions on that card, if lost, unlike cash. For the financial system, prepaid cards balances cannot be used to lend money. But banks are not starved for money right now. The Federal Reserve is offering money below the inflation rate, which means, banks are being paid to just hold money. The card balance does not flow through the system until it is used for a transaction, but it a clear benefit to the consumer who cannot afford to be connected to the financial system through depository banking. For banks, it allows them to have a credit history on those people should they eventually want to join the financial system. The banks also make money on the credit transaction. And for the system as a whole, it reduces risks involving money laundering, fraud, theft and cyber crimes.


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Marcus Maltempo is a compliance professional with more than a decade of experience helping banks, law firms and clients manage investigations and regulatory responses. He is a member of ACAMS and ACFE. 

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Spicing Up the 10-K

On August 5th, SEC will vote on a rule that would publish the ratio of CEO compensation to the typical worker of their own firm. This disclosure is required by Dodd-Frank, but, as with many laws, the details and implementation makes all of the difference in the world. SEC has delayed the implementation of this requirement, but I don’t really know why, other than CEO’s don’t like the idea.

I don’t like the idea because it unnecessarily target the CEO over other top executives. The likely comparison will be made between the CEO and an average of some pool of individuals, which is unfair. The better comparisons are with individuals against individuals or pools against pools.

full-trailer-for-50-shades-of-grI’m in favor of pools. The pools should be large and the distinction should be simple and indicative of something important. If the pay disparity is what the SEC wants to highlight because it feels that bigger disparities lead to more compliance issues, then they need to identify what is driving the disparities within the organization. Across the board, the biggest portion of disparity is equity compensation. The two pools should something quite simple. My suggestions: compare average total compensations where more than 50% of the total compensation is equity versus less.

Here’s the other problem with this disclosure: what is defined as the organization. I’m assuming Goldman Sachs does not hire any janitors. Janitors are employees of an outside firm. But Goldman Sachs wouldn’t exist without working in buildings of some sort. So, in terms of running the company called Goldman Sachs, some manager has to decide what janitorial company will be responsible cleaning their offices. As long as having offices is part of Goldman Sach business model, office cleaning services are part of its business. But legally, those janitors don’t work for Goldman Sachs. These types of outsourcing is usually on the low end of the payscale, unnaturally raising the average of the lower pool.

Similar pool problem are labor market disparities. A company whose employees are primarily in Bangladesh will be paying their lower pool significantly less than the upper pool. At the same time, the disclosure is actually made worse but hiding the disparity it is actually trying to reveal: American disparity. So, does one exclude foreign employees?

Still, the greatest benefit to my proposal is getting an understanding about how what the pay disparity is between those who are working to pump up the value of their stock and those who are trying to increase their cash compensation. This will also require the firm to put everyone in two buckets, forcing them to make a decision about what roles should be trying to pump up the stock and what roles are to be productive.

But these are implementation problems. Politicians and interested parties are still arguing over whether such information in important to shareholders. Republicans are saying that the purpose of the rule is to produce societal pressures on corporations, not actually add informational value to shareholders. I don’t have a problem with putting societal pressures on corporations, but I do wonder if this really should be the role of the SEC or if it should be the role of the DOL. Democrats and Labor are saying that  the information is going to be important for shareholders because they will be given another key piece of information about how to pay their executives, which shareholders do in a vote each year.


Should corporations be required to disclose the pay ratio between its top executive and the average worker in the firm?


About the Author: Marcus Maltempo is a compliance professional with more than a decade of experience helping banks, law firms and clients manage investigations and regulatory responses.


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