Week In Compliance: Bankers believe that their employees do not want overtime pay

American Bankers Association reports that banks believe their overtime exempt employees do not want overtime pay, as stated by Christeena Naser, Vice President and Sr Counsel. This opinion stems from the Department of Labor’s new interpretation of the Primary Duty Test. “The term “primary duty” means the principal, main, major or most important duty that the employee performs. Determination of an employee’s primary duty must be based on all the facts in a particular case, with the major emphasis on the character of the employee’s job as a whole.” (DOL). ABA goes onto to state that the Test’s objective was to identify obvious non-exempt employees, but the new interpretation would seem to try to identify obvious exempt employees. The difference in nearly $27,000, or about 30 Million employees across all industries.

The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) today announced a settlement with Desert Palace, Inc. d/b/a Caesars Palace where Caesars agreed to pay an $8 million civil money penalty for its willful and repeated violations of the Bank Secrecy Act. In addition, the casino agreed to conduct periodic external audits and independent testing of its anti-money laundering compliance program, report to FinCEN on mandated improvements, adopt a rigorous training regime, and engage in a “look-back” for suspicious transactions. – FinCEN

CFPB reported that it has handled 677,200 complaints nationally. – SubPrime Auto Finance News Staff

Big companies are some of the worst offenders in foreign corruption cases, but they are also increasingly policing themselves and self-reporting instances of bribery, new data show. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development analyzed 427 cases of foreign bribery in 17 countries to determine who’s bribing who, and how authorities are discovering corrupt practices. – Kathleen Caulderwood at International Business Times

FTC can sue companies for inadequate cyber-security protection, so says the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. – Dan Appleman at FCPA Blog

Caesar’s Palace to pay $8 Million penalty on poor compliance regime. FinCEN has also forced the Palace to take on additional action for boosting compliance an a lookback program to seek noncompliance in past transactions. “When it came to watching out for illicit activity, [Caesar’s Palace] allowed a blind spot in its compliance program,” says Jennifer Shasky, director at FinCEN.

“Whistle-blowers and insiders play an increasingly important role in our work,” says David Green, Director of the Serious Fraud Office in the UK. “I suggest… moving away from the identification principle of corporate criminal liability in English law and embracing something closer to vicarious liability, as in the USA,” he said in his speech at the 33rd Cambridge Economic Crime Symposium.

By performing an assessment of OFAC compliance programs and establishing a culture of compliance throughout the organization, a company can position itself to better understand and identify potential risk exposure. – Sven Stumbauer, Director in the Financial Crimes Compliance Practice at AlixPartners, LLP at International Banker

Jobs In Compliance

Opinion: FRB of Boston says Prepaid cards can be a savings tool, and I agree 

credit Danny Choo

Prepaid cards from credit card companies have grown significantly in the past decade. They offer credit transactions to those who do not have the credit history to have credit cards. They offer a way to build credit for those who cannot even open a bank account. These are people and families who make $25,000 or less. If you are reading this, you are very likely a person with a bank account and a credit card. You might not know, but there are people who do not qualify to have a bank account. I was once such a person. But I wasn’t the norm of such a person. I had graduated from college and I didn’t yet have a job. During college, I had a college student checking out. I was moving back home 2,000 miles away from my bank. So, I needed a local bank. Wells Fargo said that I had overdrafted too many times and I do not have a history of income that would otherwise let them overlooking this. I was shocked. I didn’t know that banks refused to open checking accounts. Even more astonishing, this was at a time when checking account were not free. I went down the street to Key Bank, who opened an account for me. I got a job and Key Bank had my business for many years. But most people who do not qualify for checking account aren’t in my position. They have never made enough money to have any savings at all, which means even if they had a checking account, it would sit empty. Even having an account for someone open a bank up to various risks, which all have a cost. But financial institutions have come up with a solution: Prepaid Card. This uses the credit network for transactions but at no time transactions beyond the amount in the card can be made. And banks do not have to offer any services, keeping all of the information on the card. Actually, in Eastern Africa, the same type of decentralized banking system is growing through cellphones. And if you think about it a little longer, Bitcoin and other cyber-currencies are just another decentralized payment system, albeit with more value involved. What Prepaid Cards offer is not merely a way to make transactions. It can be method to store value, as economists would put it. That is, a person can save money in such cards. The difference for the user is minimal for the most part. Sure, it is less secure because if you lose it, you’ve lost all of your money, just like cash. But it is safer than cash since it is possible to have an account on that card, even though it wouldn’t have any of the protections of a checking account. At least, there would be a remote way to stop transactions on that card, if lost, unlike cash. For the financial system, prepaid cards balances cannot be used to lend money. But banks are not starved for money right now. The Federal Reserve is offering money below the inflation rate, which means, banks are being paid to just hold money. The card balance does not flow through the system until it is used for a transaction, but it a clear benefit to the consumer who cannot afford to be connected to the financial system through depository banking. For banks, it allows them to have a credit history on those people should they eventually want to join the financial system. The banks also make money on the credit transaction. And for the system as a whole, it reduces risks involving money laundering, fraud, theft and cyber crimes.


How do you like the new weekly round up?


Marcus Maltempo is a compliance professional with more than a decade of experience helping banks, law firms and clients manage investigations and regulatory responses. He is a member of ACAMS and ACFE. 

Bankers believe that their employees do not want overtime pay

Williams Sisters, unlikely to be affected by new Primary Duty Test Standards | credit Youtube

American Bankers Association reports that banks believe their overtime exempt employees do not want overtime pay. That’s not exactly what Christeena Naser, Vice President and Sr Counsel, said, but she might as well have in her comment letter. The Letter goes onto to state that the Primary Duty Test‘s objective was to identify obvious non-exempt employees, but the new interpretation would identify obvious exempt employees. The difference in nearly $27,000 per eligible employee, or about 6.3 Million employees.

“The term “primary duty” means the principal, main, major or most important duty that the employee performs. Determination of an employee’s primary duty must be based on all the facts in a particular case, with the major emphasis on the character of the employee’s job as a whole.” (DOL).

The change in Standard would reach approximately 30 Million employees across all industries, 6.3 Million of which are in financial services. The previous Standard deferred to states because many state standards were more inclusive than that of the DOL. The new DOL standard is much higher. being raised from $23,660 per year to $50,440. One should know that while these figures are yearly, the Standard applies to overtime pay on a weekly basis.

“The salary standard would reduce the number of individuals eligible for the exemptions by 6.3 million salaried employees, ” ABA’s comment letter states. The implication is that banks would reduce hours of 6.3 Million employees to the lowest end of full-time status as much as possible in order to avoid paying overtime. It also implies that DOL have reason to believe that the guarantee in employment due to the salaried nature of a role is worth very little. Considering how little guarantee there is, the DOL is onto something there.

Just because a bank employee makes more than $50,440 per year without overtime pay does not mean that that employee cannot be on an hourly wage. DOL has moved the cap on all hourly wage employees from $100,000 to $122,148. This means hourly employees can qualify for overtime pay as long as the non-overtime pay is less than $122,148 per year. ABA objects to this as well.

All of these Standard change-levels are based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

ABA objects to the Standard not be adjusted for geography. This is quite valid. A community bank in rural Iowa will be hit harder than a community bank in New York City.

But the rest of the complaints, and they are truly complaints, read as veiled threats. There are a lot of justifications based on what will happen if these Standards are applied. All of them are dire. All of them do not bode well for employees. For that strategy to work, the bank would have to assume that its employees do not know what is good for them. The direness of the predictions imply that banks will be forced to hurt their employees by complying with the new DOL mandate.

If enumerating all the ways the ABA’s Comment Letter fails to make its point to someone who might have helped craft this new Standard at the DOL, the failure can be summed up thusly: ABA’s Comment Letter fails to convince the Department to stop the pursuit of the new Standards because it fails to address the issues that are important to employees as seen by the Department. At no time does the Letter acknowledge the good that the Department is trying to accomplish. So, when the Letter provides alternative solutions, it carefully avoids stating what the such solutions provide. By avoiding such valuation, the ABA avoids having their alternative compared to the Department’s solutions. And by avoiding the value of their solutions, the ABA makes their members seem unconcerned with the wellbeing of bank employees, and does not avoid to address how the new Standards are not as beneficial as they can be.

Overall, the letter is a carefully crafted legal argument wrapped in economic concerns. The DOL, I assume, are seriously concerned with economics and less so with legal intricacies.


I have read ABA’s Comment Letter for you so that you don’t have to. If you don’t like how I interpreted ABA’s Comment Letter on the new overtime exemption and HCE standards, comment below.


Marcus Maltempo is a compliance professional with more than a decade of experience helping banks, law firms and clients manage investigations and regulatory responses. He is a member of ACAMS and ACFE. 


Bibliography

Take Home Compliance

Whenever possible, Money Compliance has been trying to provide some job posts from LinkedIn in a post called Jobs in Compliance. As the blog transitions over from everyday to twice per week this fall, the Friday edition will be expanded. Jobs in Compliance will be a segment of the Friday post called Take Home Compliance. On Mondays or Tuesdays, there will be a post that will address specific compliance issues. If it hasn’t been clear, the transition of this blog will be from news (like JD Supra and FCPA Blog) and high level advice (like Michael Volkov and Richard Bistrong) to more nitty gritty. The idea is this: readers have multiple sources for news. “Experts” in the field who give advice and have exposure tend to focus on things that really aren’t very specific to compliance. Their advice could be about corporate culture in general. And while corporate culture is the best way to prevent running afoul of the law, there are lots of things that culture just cannot tackle that are really specific to the functions in the compliance department. This blog will try to provide that function specific information and advice. Also mentioned previously will be a greater effort to expand the resources page. Please look out for that in the future.

So, here’s the first entry of Take Home Compliance:

A cryptocurrency mining firm HashingSpace has filed with FinCEN as a MSB. The best known cryptocurrency is BitCoin. Money Service Business is a legal designation for non-bank financial transaction companies, not including credit cards. Western Union is the best known MSB. FinCEN is the abbreviation for Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, the division of the US Treasury that deals with the deterrence, prevention, and investigation of financial crimes outside of the capital markets. This is move to make BitCoin more accepted. BitCoin has taken a dive in the last year. A year ago it was valued above $500 per coin and now it is a little above $225, losing more than 50% of its value. The current problem with BitCoin is that it is being used as an investment rather than a vehicle for transactions. Nikhil Gupta at NewsBTC

DOJ has created a position for compliance counsel. The idea is to differentiate between effective compliance and paper compliance. Compliance with the law on a point by point basis by missing the purpose of the law is paper compliance. Common sense would lead one to believe that those in paper compliance will be prosecuted more harshly than those in effective compliance who may not meet the letter of the law because the whole point of compliance is to deter and prevent incompliance. Alison Tanchyk and Margaret Erin Rodgers at Daily Business Review

CFPB focuses on the little know Reverse Mortgages. A reverse mortgage is a unique type of loan for homeowners age 62 and older. This special type of loan is frequently insured by the Federal Housing Administration and allows homeowners to access the equity in their homes, without making monthly mortgage payments. Borrowers are not required to repay the reverse mortgage loan as long as they live in the home. However, the loan must be repaid when the last surviving borrower dies, moves out, or sells.” – Montoya M. Ho-Sang at Banking Exchange

Financial Regulator Compliance has become a boon for the people who might be working against the economy? That’s the perspective that is pushed in a Bloomberg article about JPMorgan has hired 8,000 people in compliance and controls. Supposedly even non-financial firms are hiring compliance officers to develop ethical policies to entice Millennials to join them. Even headhunters are focusing on compliance, some ditching other types of recruitment altogether. Anthony Effinger at BloombergBusiness

“Neither banks nor regulators emphasize regulatory excellence the way that they should.” That’s “why banks have trouble getting compliance right.” Kathryn L. Farrell at American Banker

From The Blog

Two compliance lessons from the Ashley Madison scandal: HERE and HERE.

Jobs in Compliance


What particular compliance requirement is making your life difficult these days?


Marcus Maltempo is a compliance professional with more than a decade of experience helping banks, law firms and clients manage investigations and regulatory responses. He is a member of ACAMS and ACFE.