Interest Rate’s Effect On Compliance

Miranda Kerr says "you're welcome"
Miranda Kerr says “you’re welcome”

I thought if Interest Rates won’t interest you then maybe Miranda Kerr would. Obviously, this only works for 2/3rds of you. (About a third of you aren’t into Miranda Kerr or any other woman.)

Interest rates have many economic effects, which I do not need to describe to my audience. The Federal Reserve decided to raise the interest rate (Fed Funds Rate), to show that the economy is doing well. There are plenty of signs that the Fed is doing this as a symbolic move but it is still under the belief that the economy is not doing well. I’m of the side that the economy isn’t doing well, but I will get into why some other day.

For certain types of compliance, problems will increase as a result of interest rate increases. Interest rates can be viewed as the cost of capital. A cost eats away at income. It puts pressure on those who are supposed to maintain costs and those who are supposed to bring  in revenue.

So, the OCC isn’t likely to see much difference in volume of issues arising from financial institutions or money service businesses. OFAC isn’t going to be affected either. But FINRA and the SEC will. FINRA moreso than SEC because they deal primarily with revenue centers. SEC doesn’t deal with operations as much as reporting issues. But, of course, when the pressure to perform increases, there might be some increases in financial statement reporting fraud cases.

FINRA will face the problem of brokers trying to replace lost revenue. No matter what the interest was, if there is an increase, the pressure increase forces some to take shortcuts. Financial statement reporting fraud is one. Others include, ghost sales, underreporting expenses, embezzling, or, in the case of brokers, churning (making additional transactions to create business).

Banking is affected as well. Mortgage bankers may provide loans to those who wouldn’t qualify with the new interest rates because the amount lent maybe be higher than the bank is willing to accept. Clients might adjust records to pass credit analysis with inflated projections or hiding liabilities, such as other loans.

All of these things can happen without interest rate increases but the increase puts more pressure on these functions.

 


Marcus Maltempo is a compliance professional with more than a decade of experience helping banks, law firms and clients manage investigations and regulatory responses. He is a member of ACAMS and ACFE. 

Advertisements

Wu Tang album not in FBI’s possession

from WIRED

That’s what you wanted to know, right?

Martin Shkreli [was] an American entrepreneur and financial and pharmaceutical executive. He is co-founder of the hedge fund MSMB Capital Management, co-founder and former chief executive officer (CEO) of the biotechnology firm Retrophin LLC and founder and CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals AG. – Wikipedia

Shkreli rose to infamy earlier this year when Turing jacked up the cost of a life-saving AIDS pill by more than 5,000% after the company acquired the rights to it. – New York Daily News

from The World’s Best Ever

Schkreli is also known for purchasing the lone copy of Wu Tang Clan’s latest album at $2 Million. He live streams himself for several hours every few days or so, which you can see on Youtube. There, you can see glimpse of the album, which is listens to from time to time and uses as a coaster.

Schkreli was arrested on using the assets of his hedge fund like his own piggybank. This is how Americans view Wall Street Bankers, and he is giving it to them. Mother Jones Magazine reported that “Most Hated Man in America” Martin Shkreli Was Just Arrested for Alleged Securities Fraud. The Daily Mail reported that ‘World’s most hated man’ Martin Shkreli arrested charges of securities fraud and running a Ponzi scheme to pay off debts from an old company.

 


Marcus Maltempo is a compliance professional with more than a decade of experience helping banks, law firms and clients manage investigations and regulatory responses. He is a member of ACAMS and ACFE. 

Life Threatening Noncompliance

from Other Words

Dennis Hastert, former Speaker of the House, has reported suffered a stroke after he plead guilty to charges related to his sex scandal.

Hastert, a Republican and a sponsor of numeral anti-gay legislation, was found have had sexual affairs and sexual misconduct with male staffers and at least one high school student while he was a wrestling coach at Yorkville High School in Illinois.

His plea, however, has to do with how he decided to handle these allegations rather than the allegations themselves. Hastert evaded reporting OCC’s currency reporting threshold by withdrawing just below the threshold of $10,000 multiple times. The threshold exists to capture money-laundering, primarily, but also other types of misconduct where transactions would be preferable in cash. He paid up to $3.5 Million in hush-money during and after his time in the House over twenty years.

Hastert’s stroke was revealed when prosecutors and his attorney exchanged correspondence that included mention of Hastert’s hospital stay. His attorney, Thomas Green, confirmed that Hastert was admitted to the hospital and remains there. He is expected to be released early next year.

 


Marcus Maltempo is a compliance professional with more than a decade of experience helping banks, law firms and clients manage investigations and regulatory responses. He is a member of ACAMS and ACFE. 

What Marie Kondo can teach us about Compliance Management

Marie Kondo is a diminutive Japanese woman in her mid-30’s who has taken over the world with her spiritual and thoughtful method of tying one’s home and soul. Her book’s English title is The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing. She has been featured on New York Times, The New Yorker, various television shows and publications. She is one of Time‘s 100 most influential people, just above John Oliver and just below Christopher Nolan. So much of a fan, Jamie Lee Curtis was asked to interview Kondo. (I’m not sure how valuable Curtis really is as a journalist since she doesn’t speak Japanese, Kondo does not speak English, and has no knowledge of Japanese culture beyond any other Hollywood personality, but I suppose, Time just thought having her involved could help sell copy.)

Compliance, if you’ve been following the news at all for the past seven years, requires some tidying up of home and soul. In this entry, I am going to take a three of Kondo’s biggest ideas and applying to Compliance Management.

  1. Take an inventory of Compliance problems that needs to be solved. Each problem should be thought through carefully but quickly for what the source of the problem is, why it continues to be a problem, and that’s it for the first step. The main point is to get your arms around the issues. Things change all the time, but if you can get your arms around the issues at a single point, then new ones are incremental additions.
  2. Then ask yourself, “Does solving this problem provide value to customers in some fashion?” Rather than prioritizing them onto a list, this simple segregation of issues filters out the ones were identified as problems to be solved, but maybe they are actually problems to be gotten rid of. This exercise might actually be made easier if you start with smaller, obviously less important problems. The idea that once you’ve gotten used to applying this filtering method, the bigger decisions won’t seem so hard.
  3. And then prioritize the remaining issues that add value to customers and work on them all in priority order. Don’t do it piecemeal. That is a trap to not getting around to it. This might mean a massive buildup of your department for several months or a year, but you will have a transformed organization because you’ve tackled compliance problems that are worth tackling.

Two things to add:

  1. You will need to take the remaining problems to tackle and estimate their cost. Do a simple cost analysis to figure out if it is worth tackling them. Even if it is important to tackle them, if your institution or department is jeopardized by tackling it, ultimately it does not serve the customer. So, the isolated issue will have to also tackle in relation to other issues.
  2. You can apply this to your own department or just to yourself. The main problem you might face is the lack of resources. Hopefully you will find that many things are not worth tackling and you will free up your time and resources to spend on the important things, but if too many things are important, rather than tackling them one by one, you should figure out a way to tackle them all within a certain amount of time. Tackling them piecemeal is the slippery slide to a time-suck.

 



How do you like applying popular culture with Compliance? 


Marcus Maltempo is a compliance professional with more than a decade of experience helping banks, law firms and clients manage investigations and regulatory responses. He is a member of ACAMS and ACFE. 

Risk reduction

There has been increasing talks about reducing the risks in our economy. While I’m not suggesting the following, but people can’t be all that serious about reducing risks if they aren’t including in the option to wipe out student debt. We have a trillion dollars worth of debt borrowed by people who make very little money and who have nothing. Essentially, most people have negative equity in their own lives. It’s hard to take an argument to reduce economic risk seriously when almost all of consumer debt can be paid off by people who can afford to pay it off while improving both the lives of debtors and the economic system by having paid for education.

Just a quick thought this crisp Saturday morning in New York.

 


Marcus Maltempo is a compliance professional with more than a decade of experience helping banks, law firms and clients manage investigations and regulatory responses. He is a member of ACAMS and ACFE. 

Week In Compliance: Retirees, be ware

Don’t trust her with your money. Kristina Svechinskaya, 26, is a Russian hacker who stole $3 Million

FINRA has proposed new rules that will allow a firm to put a temporary hold on financial transactions when abuse is suspected, and will allow the firm to contact a trusted other during this hold period. Where’s the flaw? No rule yet mandates that every financial firm and every individual advisor obtain information for a trusted contact person for every client. – Mikol S. Davis for Aging Capital 

Retirement accounts to be regulated by SEC and FINRA in 2016 – on ERISA, Andrew Welsch for On Wall Street

38% of the survey’s respondents said that compliance with TRID was their chief concern with the implementation of the new mortgage disclosure process – Ben Lane for Housing Wire

SEC observed that certain outsourced CCOs could not articulate the business or compliance risks of the registrant or, to the extent the risks were identified, whether the registrant had adopted written policies and procedures to mitigate or address those risks. In some instances, the risks described to the staff by the registrant’s principals were different than the risks described by the outsourced CCO. – on SEC’s warning about outsourced Compliance, Ethan Mark for JPSupra

Regardless of what or how many functions one chooses to outsource, it is the hiring firm that is ultimately responsible for its compliance program (not the fired firm) – Julie DiMauro from Regulatory Intelligence for Reuters 

Jobs in Compliance

 


Marcus Maltempo is a compliance professional with more than a decade of experience helping banks, law firms and clients manage investigations and regulatory responses. He is a member of ACAMS and ACFE. 

BitCoin Founder Nominated for Nobel

nobelplaqueOkay, so, the Nobel Prize for Economics is not technically a Nobel prize since it is funded by the Swedish bankers, not the Nobel Foundation. Still, they call it that because the Nobel committee selects the winner. For 2016, Satoshi Nakamoto, the inventor of BitCoin, is being nominated.

Satoshi Nakamoto might not even be a real person, although BitCoin administrators say he is. He, if he is a “he,” is technically not the inventor of BitCoin but the inventor of cryptocurrency.

Cryptocurrency are any currency that exist digitally, uses a system of recording on a public registry record transactions and there is no central recorder. It is completely decentralized. There is one additional fact about Nakamoto’s invention that is unique: money supply. There is a finite amount of currency out there and it must be “discovered” by solving a mathematical problem in conjunction with taking on the server cost of recording BitCoin transactions. Basically, anyone can be part of the central bank because anyone can “create” money… kind of. They call it mining because it is more like mining for gold because the finite number has already been created.

There are many other cryptocurrencies out there, but BitCoin was the first to use Nakamoto’s system and it is the most prevalent.

Currently, a single BitCoin costs about $375, but it once was at $1,147.25. When I first heard about it, before all the craze three years ago, it was worth just pennies. I heard about it because it was a major crime facilitator. It allowed people to buy and sell drugs without leaving a financial trace. Of course, there is still the thorny problem of having to give/receive the drugs, but with BitCoin there was one less piece of evidence of it. It was safer than cash because the transactions can be tied to specific accounts, making it impossible to steal.

BitCoin and other cryptocurrencies are an experiment in decentralized banking. The current boom in payment technology are also decentralizing the banking system. While having control over our own financial transactions is good, a decentralized banking system comes with other problems we might not yet be ready to face. Such things as financing murder and terrorism, which does happen with cryptocurrency. The statistics are not out there to show how much of cryptocurrency is used for such transactions, but the intelligence agencies are doing their work to find it.


Marcus Maltempo is a compliance professional with more than a decade of experience helping banks, law firms and clients manage investigations and regulatory responses. He is a member of ACAMS and ACFE.