Week In Compliance: Local News uses beauty as click-bait

Hello on this crisp-cool Friday here in New York. Excuse my unexplained absence, the reason was personal.

Rochelle Yazzie

News from Albuquerque: “Southwest Capital Bank has hired Rochelle Yazzie, who will work as an Operational Compliance Specialist.” Okay, so, this isn’t exactly new to the compliance world at large, but I find it funny that this is news to Albuquerque, especially for someone who is going into a role at the bottom of the compliance organization. Just goes to show you how small that town is. Yazzie showed up on the local newspaper’s “People On the Move” column. – Albuquerque Business First 

“Dozens of Swiss banks have been spilling their secrets this year as to how they encouraged U.S. clients to hide money abroad” – WSJ

New CFPB proposal would publish arbitration awards given to consumers from banks and credit unions, making it part of public record like court cases. – Tina Orem from Credit Union Times 

God giveth in investment returns – Amvona Fund LP is a hedge fund run by a Greek Orthodox church, which exempts it from compliance from SEC. It manages $20 Million. – Claire Groden at Fortune

SCCE‘s 2015 Compliance Officer Compensation Survey is out, HERE!

2015 Compliance and Ethics Officer Salary SurveySome takeaways from the aforementioned survey: It is does not include non-managing compliance officers, it does not include CAMS or CRCM or many of the technology certificates, it does not include many people in financial services (just 8%). 50% of respondents who make more than $1M in compensation per year had JD’s. And, if presentation matters to you, it used Microsoft Excel’s default setting for tables.

KeyCorp seeking $4 billion purchase of First Niagara.” (The Buffalo News). Buffalo, NY is obviously worried that this could mean job losses for the area. For me, I’m observing KeyCorp executing on a long tradition of itself: buying smaller banks. KeyCorp’s ambition is to become another national bank, the likes of JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, Wells Fargo, and Bank of America Merrill Lynch. There are couple other contenders for such a role: PNC, USBancorp, Capital One, Suntrust, BB&T, Fifth Third, Citizens, M&T, and Huntingdon.

Singapore‘s tax authority collects $217 Million in unpaid taxes. (The Business Times). Even on the island of prosperity, tax evasion happens.

Goldman Sachs fined $50M by NY regulator for leaking data from Federal Reserve Bank of New York. (ValueWalk).

Jobs In Compliance

Opinion: 3,415 American renounced their citizenship

American immigration policy is a problem. Not just do poor people from other nations want to come here but rich people from America want to leave. In 2014, 3,415 people gave up their American citizenship. As of September 30, 2015, 3,221 people gave up their citizenship. That’s 15 times more than in 2008. (Sophie Yan of Local Syracuse). This is a result of FATCA, the tax law that requires reporting assets held by American in foreign jurisdictions. The law’s reach is long, just $10,000 in assets. While it is illegal to renounce American citizenship because of the tax bill associated with foreign assets, the the law faces a steep cultural hill. America was founded on the fact that it did not want to pay taxes to Britain. The problem with many of the new financial regulations is that they don’t tackle the primary problems, they tackle tertiary ones. FATCA is no different. Reporting foreign assets might be a solution to getting information, but proving that a person gave up citizenship due to taxes is quite difficult. Without explicit evidence, the only evidence that would exists, at best, are circumstantial. Plus, not all jurisdictions cooperate with the US, and even when they do, they don’t cooperate with laws that would be financially beneficial to them. FATCA is one of those laws. They could be giving up valuable tax dollars in various forms if the interested person finds the jurisdiction supporting US tax policies that was being evaded. The other problem with jurisdiction is that FATCA will likely reveal tax avoiders, not tax evaders. The difference is that tax avoiders are avoid taxes using the rules while tax evaders are not paying taxes they are supposed to be paying either by misclassifying accounting rules or simply hiding the funds through some legal convolution. The solution for the immigration problem is extremely complicated. Plus, I don’t have an integrated, holistic one to share with you. I just wanted to point out that regardless of the law, the culture of not paying taxes is the primary problem. The solution really should be cultural, not legal.


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Marcus Maltempo is a compliance professional with more than a decade of experience helping banks, law firms and clients manage investigations and regulatory responses. He is a member of ACAMS and ACFE. 

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